NCL 49 – Fruits of the Earth by Frederick P. Grove


Previous Book Next Book


Fruits of the Earth by Frederick Philip Grove (New Canadian Library N49) front coverSeries One

From the Back Cover:

In this classic novel, the author of The Master of the Mill and Over Prairie Trails [Frederick Philip Grove] recreates the often unperceived tragedy of the pioneer. His hero, Abe Spalding, is an epic figure–a pioneer type both real and symbolic–who in 1900 set his mark wide and deep on an unclaimed corner of Manitoba, founding a small community and acquiring a substantial fortune and a magnificent house. At the peak of his achievement he watched as all he had built began to dwindle and decay, broken by the complexities of the new world he created but could not cope with.


Fruits of the Earth by Frederick P. Grove (New Canadian Library N49)

Series Two

From the Back Cover:

In this classic novel, the author of The Master of the Mill and Over Prairie Trails [Frederick Philip Grove] recreates the often unperceived tragedy of the pioneer. His hero, Abe Spalding, set his mark wide and deep on an unclaimed corner of Manitoba, founding a small community, acquiring a substantial fortune and magnificent house. At the peak of his achievement, all he had built slowly began to decay, broken by the complexities of the new world he had created but could not cope with.


Fruits of the Earth by Frederick Philip Grove (New Canadian Library N49)Series Three

From the Back Cover:

“…a Canadian epic…containing a fascinating portrayal of personalities and Canadian life…” – Lethbridge Herald

First published in 1933, this novel has come to be regarded as a classic of Canadian literature, a powerful and unparalleled depiction of the ordeals endured by the early pioneers of the western prairies.

Frederick Philip Grove chose a single man, the dogged Abe Spalding, to tell the story of those terrible early years of endless toil and unremitting poverty. Abe arrived in Manitoba in 1900 to settle his claim on the flat prairie. Unlike many of the pioneers, Abe succeeded beyond his wildest dreams–founding a small community, acquiring a fortune, and building a magnificent house. Yet at the peak of his achievement, all he built slowly began to decay, broken by the complexities of the new world he had helped to create but could not cope with.

Fruits of the Earth is a powerful and compelling story, recreating an era of Canadian history with stunning authenticity.


Fruits of the Earth by Frederick Philip Grove (New Canadian Library) front coverSeries Four

From the Back Cover:

First published in 1933, FRUITS OF THE EARTH has come to be regarded as a landmark in Canadian fiction, an unparalleled depiction of the ordeals endured by the early pioneers of the western prairies.  In this portrait of Abe Spalding, Frederick Philip Grove captures the essence of the pioneering spirit: its singleminded strength, its nobility, and ultimately, its tragedy. A novel of broad scope and perception, FRUITS OF THE EARTH displays a dignity and stature rare in contemporary works of fiction.


Fruits of the Earth by Frederick Philip Grove (New Canadian Library) front coverSeries Five

From the Back Cover:

First published in 1933, Fruits of the Earth has come to be regarded as a landmark in Canadian fiction, an unparalleled depiction of the ordeals endured by the early pioneers of the western prairies.  In his portrait of Abe Spalding, Frederick Philip Grove captures the essence of the pioneering spirit: its singleminded strength, its nobility, and ultimately, its tragedy. A novel of broad scope and perception, Fruits of the Earth displays a dignity and stature rare in contemporary works of fiction.


Previous Book Next Book


Leave a Reply