NCL 66 – The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by Modecai Richler


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The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by Mordecai Richler (New Canadian Library N66) front coverSeries One

From the Back Cover:

“Where Duddy Kravitz sprung from the boys grew up dirty and sad, spiky also, like grass beside the railroad tracks.” And this is the irreverent, raucous and touching story of Duddy himself, that thin and spiky boy who was determined to get what wanted, no matter what the cost to other people.

What Duddy wanted was land–a man without land is nobody, his grandfather had told him. The saga of his ruthless struggle to acquire his land and to fight his way to at least the second rung of the ladder is told with tough and uncompromising exuberance.

Nothing, finally, was sacred to Duddy–not even Yvette’s or his grandfather’s love–or his own self-respect. This warm, funny, richly human book, tragic in its final overtones, is ruthless in its revelation of a two-timing, trouble-making young Jew and the colourful and complex world of Jewish and non-Jewish Montreal.

The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, first published in 1959, was Mordecai Richler’s fourth novel, and firmly established him as one of Canada’s major novelists. It brilliantly displays his capacity for deft characterization and vital dialogue, as well as his exceptional talent for parody which was to reach full fruit in Cocksure, published in 1968. The excellent introduction by A. R. Bevan adds much to this latest edition.


The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by Mordecai Richler (New Canadian Library N66)

Series Two

From the Back Cover:

“Where Duddy Kravitz sprung from the boys grew up dirty and sad, spiky also, like grass beside the railroad tracks.” And this is the irreverent, raucous and touching story of Duddy himself, that thin and spiky boy who was determined to get what wanted, no matter what the cost to other people. Nothing, finally, was sacred to Duddy–not even Yvette’s or his grandfather’s love–or his own self-respect. His saga, set in the complex worlds of Jewish and non-Jewish Montreal is funny, bitter, and at all times richly human.

Duddy Kravitz was Mordecai Richler’s fourth novel. It brilliantly displays his capacity for characterization and zest dialogue, as well as his exceptional talent for parody. First published in 1959, it firmly established him as one of Canada’s major novelists.


The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by Mordecai Richler (New Canadian Library N66) front coverSeries Three

From the Back Cover:

The human comedy, the Canadian comedy, and the Jewish comedy… all three blend together in this rollicking novel.

Duddy Kravitz dreams of owning land. And he will do almost anything to make his dream come true.

He will wheel and deal. He will swindle and forge. He will even try making movies. And in spite of the setbacks he suffers, the personal price he has to pay, Duddy never loses his ardent belief that his goal is worth it all.

This is a satirical novel about a man who learns the hard way that dreams are never exactly what they seem. Even when they do come true. [Mordecai Richler]


The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by Mordecai Richler (New Canadian Library) Front CoverSeries Four

From the Back Cover:

Some kid.  Some operator.  Growing up on St. Urbain Street in the heart of the Jewish ghetto of Montreal, Duddy Kravitz is obsessed by his grandfather’s saying, “A man without land is nothing.”  Unscrupulous and inventive, ruthless and untried, Duddy is one of the most magnetic anti-heroes in Canadian fiction.  His relentless pursuit of property is Mordecai Richler’s beloved comedy about the coming-of-age of a cynical dreamer.
THE APPRENTICESHIP OF DUDDY KRAVITZ was made into a critically acclaimed motion picture in 1974.

“The most influential writer of his generation.” – Macleans


The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by Mordecai Richler (New Canadian Library) front coverSeries Five

From the Back Cover:

Some kid.  Some operator.  Growing up on St. Urbain Street in the heart of the Jewish ghetto of Montreal, Duddy Kravitz is obsessed by his grandfather’s saying, “A man without land is nothing.”  Unscrupulous and inventive, ruthless and untried, Duddy is one of the most magnetic anti-heroes in Canadian fiction.  His relentless pursuit of property is Mordecai Richler’s beloved comedy about the coming-of-age of a cynical dreamer.

The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz was made into a critically acclaimed motion picture in 1974.


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