NCL 46 – Winter Studies and Summer Rambles in Canada by Anna Brownell Jameson


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Winter Studies and Summer Rambles in Canada by Anna Brownell Jameson (New Canadian Library N46) front coverSeries One

From the Back Cover:

As an intellectual and thereby somewhat eccentric lady of society, Anna Jameson’s vivid diary-style description of life in Upper Canada remains perennially popular nearly one hundred and thirty years after she disdainfully shook the mud of Muddy York from her satin slippers. Her keen eye for detail and her pithy prose recreate with vivid freshness the flavour of the pre-Confederation era.


Winter Studies and Summer Rambles in Canada by Anna Brownell Jameson (New Canadian Library N46) front coverSeries Two

From the Back Cover:

As an intellectual and thereby somewhat eccentric lady of society, Anna Jameson’s vivid diary-style description of life in Upper Canada remains perennially popular – even though it is well over a hundred years since she disdainfully shook the mud of Muddy York from her satin slippers. Her keen eye for detail and her pithy prose recapture the flavour of the pre-Confederation era with startling freshness.


Winter Studies and Summer Rambles in Canada by Anna Brownell Jameson (New Canadian Library N46)Series Three

From the Back Cover:

In 1836, the beautiful Anna Jameson sailed from London, England, to join her husband in Upper Canada where he was serving as Attorney General.

Shaking off the mud of Muddy York with mild disdain, young Mrs. Jameson swiftly sailed forth to discover the New World for herself.

Winter Studies and Summer Rambles in Canada is her own wonderfully entertaining account of her adventures, ranging from gleeful observations about the pretensions of high society in the colonies to a “wild expedition” she took by canoe into Indian country.

Anna Jameson’s keen eye, intrepid spirit and irreverent sense of humour make this journal as vivid and fascinating as the author herself clearly was. A book that has remained in print for more than one hundred forty years, it is both an invaluable record of life in pre-Confederation Canada and a delightful excursion with a unique woman of her time.


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