LL 9 – The Loved and the Lost by Morley Callaghan


The Loved and the Lost by Morley Callaghan (Laurentian Library 9) front coverThe Loved and the Lost

From the Back Cover:

Peggy Sanderson refused to recognize colour bars of any kind. She thought of people as human beings, treated them as such, and wanted to live her life according to her own nature. But in pursuing her obsession to be accepted by the Negro community of Montreal she ruined her career, thwarted a marriage, kindled hatreds, and ensured a tragic end for herself.

Peggy was many things to many people. To the respectable citizens of Montreal she was morally suspect and even a dangerous radical. To the Negroes she was a source of embarrassment and danger. To Jim McAlpine she was someone to love, to try to reform, and at last to betray.

Here is a deceptively straightforward, dramatic treatment of a truly complex and important theme. The Loved and the Lost received the Governor General’s Award for Fiction in 1951.


The Loved and the Lost by Morley Callaghan (Laurentian Library 9) front coverThe Loved and the Lost (LB)

From the Back Cover:

Peggy Sanderson refused to recognize colour bars of any kind. She thought of people as human beings, treated them as such, and wanted to live her life according to her own nature. But in pursuing her obsession to be accepted by the Negro community of Montreal she ruined her career, thwarted a marriage, kindled hatreds, and ensured a tragic end for herself.

Here is a deceptively straightforward, dramatic treatment of a truly complex and important theme. The Loved and the Lost received the Governor General’s Award for Fiction in 1951.

Morley Callaghan was born in Toronto in1903. In the course of a writing career spanning forty-nine years, he has produced eighteen books that have established him as one of Canada’s most distinguished authors, and gained him a nomination for a Nobel Prize. His most recent books are A Fine and Private Place (1975) and Close to the Sun Again (1977).

‘…a writer whose work may be mentioned without absurdity in association with Chekhov’s and Turgenev’s.’  Edmund Wilson in O Canada

‘… a landmark in Canadian writing.’  Hugo McPherson in Literary History of Canada

‘This is probably Mr. Callaghan’s finest, and certainly his tenderest, novel.’  B. K. Sandwell in Saturday Night


The Loved and the Lost by Morley Callaghan (Laurentian Library 9) front coverThe Loved and the Lost (LB) (Variation)

From the Back Cover:

“This is probably Mr. Callaghan’s finest, and certainly his tenderest, novel.” – B. K. Sandwell in Saturday Night

Winner of the 1951 Governor General’s Award for Fiction, The Loved and the Lost tells the story of Peggy Sanderson, a young girl determined to set her life firmly within the black community of Montreal in the early fifties. Either unwilling or unable to recognize that she alienates both white and black, she ignores the warnings of the only person who accepts her honesty, Jim McAlpine, a recently hired columnist for the Montreal Sun and a newcomer from Toronto. Tragically, Peggy destroys not only herself but Jim’s chances for a contented marriage and a successful career.

Morley Callaghan is the internationally acclaimed author of seventeen novels and dozens of short stories. For his distinguished contribution to Canadian literature he was made a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1982. In 1983 he celebrated not only his eightieth birthday but also the publication of a new novel, A Time for Judas.

”…a writer whose work may be mentioned without absurdity in association with Chekhov’s and Turgenev’s.” – Edmund Wilson


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